Tag Archives: brendan canty

Fugazi, Slowest Clock, Not Our World – Dublin 1989

 

November 23 1989

Fugazi, Slowest Clock, Not Our World

McGonagles

Fugazi was the band that really got things going for Hope. This gig, their second visit to Ireland, was packed out. We were totally taken by surprise. For a while it  was looking hairy – Snuff were due to play but had to pull out of the gig due to a death in their family so Slowest Clock, from Dublin stepped in at very short notice.

In a repeat of what happened the first time they came over, Fugazi missed the ferry. I was playing in the first band and when we went on stage Fugazi still hadn’t  shown up. There were no mobile phones then so my Dad drove into the gig to tell us that Fugazi were in Holyhead at 4 pm and were due to get the next ferry. In the event, things worked out fine. Fugazi arrived in plenty of time, during our set, and literally shook McGonagles that night. The PA kept threatening to fall over and we had to station people to just hold the speaker stands up. There was a lot of dancing and many people felt they could get up on stage and jump into the crowd at will – something Fugazi and plenty of others in the audience didn’t want. I was amazed afterwards when we went to count the money with Ian McKaye, singer with Fugazi. There was £1400 left after the venue and PA had been paid. Ian said “how about we take £550 and you use the rest to do other things”.

After receiving his reassurance that it was ok I said fine/thanks a million. We used that money to start a ‘Hope’ fund, money that could be used as a back-up in case things didn’t go accoding to plan. ‘Hope’ then got to put on a load of great bands, give them at least their ferry fare regardless of crowd numbers and release a record. Fugazi assisted in that happening and Dublin owes them a great debt.

GFugaziSnuff

NotOurWorldNiall

Niall – Not Our World

Slowest Clock

Slowest Clock stood in for Snuff on the night

Advertisements

1 Comment

Filed under Gig Details

My Favourite Gig – Brendan Canty

This is the second in a weekly series all taken from Hope 2. The fanzine sees a collection of 70 contributors from the punk rock world.  All asked the same question

My Favourite Gig by Brendan Canty, Deathfix, Fugazi, Rites of Spring, One Last Wish etc

The Mummies + Thee Headcoats

Calgary, early 90’s

 

Guy and I ducked out after a Fugazi gig one night in the early nineties in Calgary, and went over to see Thee Headcoats play. The Mummies were opening up, but we had no idea who they were at the time. We were just both big Billy Childish fans.

The place was small and I think a biker bar. There were certainly mostly bikers there. Definitely not the place to be by the looks of it. Yet, as we all know, life usually runs in the converse of expectations.

When the Mummies hit the stage they hit with such force and commitment that everyone’s mind was playing catch up with what they were seeing. 4 totally disgusting looking fully costumed in filthy rag mummies were beating their instruments to death and whipping through killer garage tracks one after another. Everyone in the room got into it in one way or another. After a while one of the drunk biker women went to the bathroom and wrapped herself in toilet paper mummy-style and came out and stood in front of the stage giving the band two birds. This made them even more jacked up.

As the singer rocked his Farfisa back and forth hanging from the water pipe above the stage, the organ gave way and he came crashing down with his arm breaking between his body and the keyboard. He kept playing.

After the set Thee Headcoats couldn’t really do much. I’ve seen them and loved them, but that night they dissolved into a mess and eventually broke up on stage when the drummer took the only working microphone and used it as a drumstick. Billy Childish quit and walked out of the club. It seemed like a reasonable response. We were all wiped.

Brendan’s latest recorded output was Deathfix and his lates band is Super Silver Haze

 

Brendan Canty

Leave a comment

Filed under hope